Below is a short list of careers with job descriptions and correlations to the stations offered in the Jenifer Technology Lab.  This list simply represents a few professions that use technology on a regular basis.  This is in no way a complete list of careers that use technology.  For a more complete list, please refer to the U.S. Department of Labor website.
 
Advertising Managers:
Advertising managers oversee advertising and promotions for their business or company.  They help make commercials or ads found in radio, television, newspapers, magazines, the Internet, or outdoor signs as they promote their business' products or services.  Advertising managers may work with graphics, video, and sound files as they design their commercials and ads.  Technology stations such as Print Shop, Sound Engineering, CorelDraw, Photoshop, Digital Photography and Graphic Design, Video Editing, , Animation, Photo Editing, and Web Page Design introduce students to a field in advertising.
 
Air Traffic Controllers:
The air traffic control system is a vast network of people and equipment that ensures the safe operation of commercial and private aircraft.  Air traffic controllers coordinate the movement of air traffic to make certain that planes stay a safe distance apart.  Their immediate concern is safety, but controllers also must direct planes efficiently to minimize delays.  Some regulate airport traffic through designated airspaces; others regulate airport arrivals and departures.  The Flight Simulator station in the technology lab introduces students to a career in this field.
 
Architects:
Architects create the overall aesthetic and look of buildings and other structures, but the design of a building involves far more than its appearance.  Buildings also must be functional, safe, and economical and must suit the needs of the people who use them.  Architects consider all these factors when they design buildings and other structures.  Most architects use a CADD (Comptuer-Aided Design and Drafting) program when making their designs.  Technology stations such as Easy CAD and 3-D Home Architecture introduce students to the field of architecture.
 
Biological Scientists:
Biological scientists study living organisms and their relationship to the environment. They perform research to gain a better understanding of fundamental life processes or apply that understanding to developing new products or processes. Many biological scientists work in research and development and make models of the organisms they study so they can better analyze their design and function.  A technology station such as Zoob introduces students to concepts in the biological designs of DNA and skeletal structures of dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures.
 
Broadcast Technician:
Broadcast technicians set up, operate, and maintain equipment that regulates the signal strength, clarity, and the range of sounds and colors of radio or television broadcasts. These technicians also operate control panels to select the source of the material. Technicians may switch from one camera or studio to another, from film to live programming, or from network to local programming.  Stations in the technology lab such as Sound Engineering, Intro to Music, and Video Editing introduce students to this career field.
 
Carpenters:
Carpenters construct, erect, install, and repair structures and fixtures made from wood and other materials.  Some carpenters do many different carpentry tasks, while others specialize in one or two. Carpenters who remodel homes and other structures, for example, need a broad range of carpentry skills. As part of a single job, for example, they might frame walls and partitions, put in doors and windows, build stairs, install cabinets and molding, and complete many other tasks.  Technology stations such as Easy CAD and 3-D Home Architecture introduce students to this career field as they design a 2-D (blueprint) and 3-D layout of a house.
 
Cartoonists and Animators:
Cartoonists and animators work primarily in motion picture and video industries, advertising, and computer systems design services. They draw by hand and use computers to create the series of pictures that form the animated images or special effects seen in movies, television programs, and computer games. Some draw storyboards for television commercials, movies, and animated features.  Technology stations such as Paint and Animation, Digital Photography and Graphic Design, Web Page Design, and Video Editing introduce students to a field of cartoon and animation.
 
Computer Programmers:
Computer programmers write, test, and maintain the detailed instructions, called programs, that computers and other electronic devices follow to perform their functions.  Programmers also conceive, design, and test logical structures for solving problems by computers. With the help of other computer specialists, they figure out which instructions to use to make computers and other electronic devices do specific tasks.  Technology stations such as Programming the TI-83 Graphing Calculator, LEGO Minstorms, LASY Control Systems, Fichertechnic Bionic Robots, and Voice Recognition introduce students to a field in computer programming.
 
Drafters:
Drafters prepare technical drawings and plans, which are used to build everything from manufactured products such as toys, toasters, industrial machinery, and spacecraft to structures such as houses, office buildings, and oil and gas pipelines.  In the past, drafters sat at drawing boards and used pencils, pens, compasses, protractors, triangles, and other drafting devices to prepare a drawing by hand. Now, most drafters use Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) systems to prepare drawings. With CADD systems, drafters can create and store drawings electronically so that they can be viewed, printed, or programmed directly into automated manufacturing systems.  A technology station such as EASY CAD introduces students to a field in drafting.
 
Electricians:
Electricians bring electricity into homes, businesses, and factories. They install and maintain the wiring, fuses, and other components through which electricity flows. Many electricians also install and maintain electrical machines in factories.  Electricians usually start their work by reading blueprints. Blueprints are technical diagrams that show the locations of circuits, outlets, load centers, panel boards, and other equipment.  Technology stations that deal with electrical systems, which in turn produce moving parts, introduce students to this field.  These stations include Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, Electronics, EASY CAD, and 3-D Home Architecture.
 
Electronics Repairer:
Electronics repairers install, diagnose, and repair electronic equipment, including computers, home appliances, and hand-held devices.  They need to be knowledgeable in various electrical systems and have a solid understanding of not only how circuits operate, but also how the parts of the electrical system interact with each other.  Identifying faulty parts such as motors, gears, resistors, diodes, and capacitors are among the many jobs of an electronics repairer.  Stations in the technology lab such as Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, and Electronics introduce students to a career of an electronic repairer.
 
Engineers (General):
Engineers apply the principles of science and mathematics to develop economical solutions to technical problems. Their work is the link between scientific discoveries and the commercial applications that meet societal and consumer needs.  Many engineers develop new products. During this process, they make models of the product they are eventually wanting to produce. This saves money as models cost far less to make than the products being developed.  Engineers use computers extensively to produce and analyze designs; to simulate and test how a machine, structure, or system operates; to generate specifications for parts; and to monitor product quality and control process efficiency.  Engineers need to be knowledgeable in mechanical, electrical, and manufacturing systems.  Stations in the technology lab such as Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, Transportation, and Electronics introduce students to a career of an engineer.
 
Engineers (Aerospace):
Aerospace engineers
design, develop, and test aircraft, spacecraft, and missiles and supervise the manufacture of these products.  Aerospace engineers develop new technologies for use in aviation, defense systems, and space exploration, often specializing in areas such as structural design, guidance, navigation and control, instrumentation and communication, or production methods.  Stations in the technology lab such as K'Nex, Rotobix, Flight Simulator, and Electronics introduce students to a career of an aerospace engineer.
 
Engineers (Civil):
Civil engineers
design and supervise the construction of roads, buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges, and water supply and sewage systems. They must consider many factors in the design process, from the construction costs and expected lifetime of a project to government regulations and potential environmental hazards such as earthquakes and hurricanes.  Stations in the technology lab such as Capsela, K'Nex, Zoob, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Modeling the Mean Machine, and Transportation introduce students to a career of an civil engineer.
 
Engineers (Computer):
Computer engineers
research, design, develop, test, and oversee the manufacture and installation of computer hardware including computer chips, circuit boards, and computer systems.  The work of computer hardware engineers is very similar to that of electronics engineers in that they may design and test circuits and other electronic components, but computer hardware engineers do that work only as it relates to computers and computer-related equipment. The rapid advances in computer technology are largely a result of the research, development, and design efforts of these engineers.  Stations in the technology lab such as Electronics and Programming the TI-83 Graphing Calculator introduce students to a career of an computer engineer.
 
Engineers (Electrical):
Electrical engineers
design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacture of electrical equipment.  Some of this equipment includes electric motors; machinery controls, lighting, and wiring in buildings; automobiles; aircraft; radar and navigation systems; and power generation, control, and transmission devices used by electric utilities.  Electrical engineers specialize in areas such as power systems engineering or electrical equipment manufacturing.  Technology stations that deal with electrical systems, which in turn produce moving parts, introduce students to this field.  These stations include Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, and Electronics.
 
Engineers (Industrial):
Industrial engineers
determine the most effective ways to use the basic factors of production—people, machines, materials, information, and energy—to make a product or provide a service. They are primarily concerned with increasing productivity through the management of people, methods of business organization, and technology. To maximize efficiency, industrial engineers carefully study the product requirements and design manufacturing and information systems to meet those requirements with the help of mathematical methods and models. They also design or improve systems for the physical distribution of goods and services and determine the most efficient plant locations.  Stations in the technology lab that emphasize manufacturing such as Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, Transportation, and Electronics introduce students to a career of an industrial engineer.
 
Engineers (Mechanical):
Mechanical engineers
research, design, develop, manufacture, and test tools, engines, machines, and other mechanical devices.  Engineers in this discipline work on power-producing machines such as electric generators, internal combustion engines, and steam and gas turbines. They also work on power-using machines such as refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment, machine tools, material handling systems, elevators and escalators, industrial production equipment, and robots used in manufacturing.  Stations in the technology lab that emphasize mechanical systems such as Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, Transportation, and Electronics introduce students to a career of a mechanical engineer.
 
Graphic Designers:
Graphic designers develop the overall layout and production design of magazines, newspapers, journals, corporate reports, and other publications. They also produce promotional displays, packaging, and marketing brochures for products and services, design distinctive logos for products and businesses, and develop signs for business and government. An increasing number of graphic designers also develop material for Internet web pages, interactive media, and multimedia projects.  Graphic designers prepare sketches or layouts—by hand or with the aid of a computer—to illustrate their vision for the design. They select colors, sound, artwork, photography, animation, style of type, and other visual elements for the design.  Stations in the technology lab that introduce students to a field in graphic design include Digital Photography and Graphic Design, Animation, Photo Editing, CorelDraw, Video Editing, and Web Page Design.
 
Industrial Machinery Mechanics:
Imagine an automobile assembly line: a large conveyor system moves unfinished automobiles down the line, giant robotic welding arms bond the different body panels together, hydraulic lifts move the motor into the body of the car, and giant presses stamp body parts from flat sheets of steel. All of these machines—the hydraulic lifts, the robotic welders, the conveyor system, and the giant presses—sometimes break down. When the assembly line stops because a machine breaks down, it costs the company money. Industrial machinery mechanics and machinery maintenance workers maintain and repair these very different, and often very expensive, machines.  Stations in the technology lab that emphasize both mechanical and manufacturing systems such as Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, Transportation, and Electronics introduce students to a career of an industrial machinery mechanic.
 
Interior Designers:
Interior designers design and decorate interior spaces with consideration to colors, textures, furniture, lighting, and space to meet the needs of a building’s occupants. Designers plan interior spaces of almost every type of building, including offices, airport terminals, theaters, shopping malls, restaurants, hotels, schools, hospitals, and homes. Good design can boost office productivity, increase sales, attract a more affluent clientele, provide a more relaxing hospital stay, or increase a building’s market value.  Interior designers must be able to read blueprints and know how to best utilize limited space. Designers frequently collaborate with architects, electricians, and building contractors to ensure that designs are safe and meet construction requirements.  Technology stations such as Easy CAD and 3-D Home Architecture introduce students to the career field of interior design.
 
Landscape Architects:
Everyone enjoys attractively designed residential areas, public parks and playgrounds, college campuses, shopping centers, golf courses, and parkways. Landscape architects design these areas so that they are not only functional, but also beautiful, and compatible with the natural environment. They plan the location of buildings, roads, and walkways, and the arrangement of flowers, shrubs, and trees.  Technology stations such as Easy CAD and 3-D Home Architecture introduce students to the career field of interior design.
 
Mathematicians:
Mathematicians use theories and techniques, such as mathematical modeling and computational methods, to formulate and solve practical problems in business, government, engineering, and every day life. For example, they may analyze the most efficient way to schedule airline routes between cities, the effects and safety of new drugs, the aerodynamic characteristics of an experimental automobile, or the cost-effectiveness of alternative manufacturing processes.  Some mathematicians, called cryptanalysts, analyze and decipher encryption systems—codes—designed to transmit military, political, financial, or law enforcement-related information.  Although none of the stations in the technology lab deal directly with mathematics, many help students with 3-D visualization concepts with hands-on kits such as Zoob, K'Nex, Capsela, Modeling the Mean Machine, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, LEGO Mindstorms, and Robotix.  Problem-solving is a huge part of being a successful mathematician as is being a successful student in the technology lab.  Have you applied problem-solving techniques at your station?  Well then, you are preparing yourself for a career in any math-related field!
 
Mechanics:
Automotive service technicians inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks that run on gasoline, electricity, or alternative fuels such as ethanol. Automotive service technicians’ and mechanics’ responsibilities have evolved from simple mechanical repairs to high-level technology-related work. The increasing sophistication of automobiles requires workers who can use computerized shop equipment and work with electronic components while maintaining their skills with traditional hand tools. As a result, automotive service workers are now usually called technicians rather than mechanics.  Stations in the technology lab such as Capsela, K'Nex, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, Transportation, and Electronics introduce students to a career of a mechanic.
 
Musicians (Singers and Band Members):
Musicians, singers, and band members play musical instruments, sing, compose, or arrange music to be performed in front of an audience or recorded to CD.  They entertain live audiences in nightclubs, concert halls, and theaters; others perform in recording or production studios. Regardless of the setting, musicians, singers, and band members spend considerable time practicing either alone or with their bands.  Many musicians edit their recordings using computer software or use technology in place of an instrument, creating a "synthesized" instrument.  The Sound Engineering and Intro to Music stations in the Technology Lab introduce students to a career path of musicians.
 
Music Composers:
Music composers create original music such as symphonies, operas, sonatas, radio and television jingles, film scores, and popular songs. They transcribe ideas into musical notation, using harmony, rhythm, melody, and tonal structure. Although most composers and songwriters practice their craft on instruments and transcribe the notes with pen and paper, some use computer software to compose and edit their music.  The Sound Engineering and Intro to Music stations in the Technology Lab introduce students to a career path of music composers.
 
Photographers:
Photographers produce and preserve images that paint a picture, tell a story, or record an event. To create commercial-quality photographs, photographers need technical expertise, creativity, and the appropriate professional equipment.  Digital cameras capture images electronically, allowing them to be edited on a computer.  Once the raw image has been transferred to a computer, photographers can use processing software to crop or modify the image and enhance it through color correction and other specialized effects. As soon as a photographer has finished editing the image, it can be sent anywhere in the world over the Internet.  Stations in the technology lab that introduce students to a field in photography include Digital Photography and Graphic Design, Photo Editing, CorelDraw, Video Editing, and Web Page Design.
 
Physicists:
Physicists explore and identify basic principles and laws governing the motion, energy, structure, and interactions of matter. Some physicists study theoretical areas, such as the nature of time and the origin of the universe; others apply their knowledge of physics to practical areas, such as the development of advanced materials, electrical devices, and machinery.  They attempt to discover and explain laws describing the forces of nature, such as gravity, electromagnetism, and nuclear interactions. Experiments also help physicists find ways to apply physical laws and theories to problems in nuclear energy, electronics, optics, materials, communications, aerospace technology, and machinery.  Technology stations like K'Nex, Capsela, Meet the Mighty Mechanisms, Zoob, Robotix, Modeling the Mean Machine, LEGO Mindstorms, and Electronics introduce students to a career as a physicist.
 
Pilots:
Pilots are highly trained professionals who either fly airplanes or helicopters to carry out a wide variety of tasks.  Before departure, pilots plan their flights carefully.  They thoroughly check their aircraft to make sure that the engines, controls, instruments, and other systems are functioning properly.  They also make sure that baggage or cargo has been loaded correctly. They confer with flight dispatchers and aviation weather forecasters to find out about weather conditions en route and at their destination. Based on this information, they choose a route, altitude, and speed that will provide the safest, most economical, and smoothest flight. Technology stations like the Flight Simulator station introduce students to a career as a pilot.
 
Secretary (Legal Secretary and Paralegals):
While lawyers assume ultimate responsibility for legal work, they often delegate many of their tasks to paralegals and legal secretaries.  Legal secretaries prepare written reports that attorneys use in determining how cases should be handled.  Paralegals may help prepare the legal arguments, draft pleadings and motions to be filed with the court, obtain affidavits, and assist attorneys during trials.  Paralegals also organize and track files of all important case documents and make them available and easily accessible to attorneys.  To make their job easier, many legal secretaries oftentimes make use of dictation software that allows them to speak into the computer through a microphone while the computer types what they are speaking.  Technology stations like the Voice Recognition station introduce students to a career as a legal secretary.
 
Small Business Owners:
A small business owner is someone who owns their own business and employs less than 100 people.  Small business owners sell products such as office supplies or household items and/or provide services such a repair work or the installation of new products.  Many small business owners don't have the resources to pay someone to make brochures, business cards, pamphlets, and websites.  So, someone in the business is usually given the task of producing these items.  Technology stations such as Small Business Design with Print Shop, Web Page Design, CorelDraw, Photo Editing, and Digital Photography and Graphic Design introduce students to concepts necessary for being a small business owner.
 
Sound Engineer:
Sound Engineers set up and operate audio and video equipment, including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, and recording equipment. They also connect wires and cables and set up and operate sound and mixing boards and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences.  Sound engineering technicians operate machines and equipment to record, synchronize, mix, or reproduce music, voices, or sound effects in recording studios, sporting arenas, theater productions, or movie and video productions.  Technology stations such as Sound Engineering, Video Editing, and Intro to Music introduce students to the field of Sound Engineering.
 
Web Designers:
Web designers create web pages for businesses or individuals who want to either advertise a product/service or just "get the word out."  Most webs designers are fluent in HTML coding and have experience creating and working with various graphics.  Stations in the technology lab that introduce students to a career path of web designing include the Digital Photography and Graphic Design, Animation, Web Page Design, Photo Editing, and CorelDraw stations.